The Ultimate Guide to Planning a Trip to Copenhagen

Copenhagen marked my first ever trip to Europe. I stayed there for almost 10 days and have explored almost all the areas of this gorgeous city. It’s quaint houses, cobbled streets, and flowery streets blew me away. What makes Copenhagen different from other European capital cities is the respect for the environment they have. People use bicycles to commute everywhere, they always make to the top of the list of the happiest people on earth, and they truly respect regeneration and sustainability.  They are mindful of the environment.

I wrote this guide to help you plan your perfect trip to Copenhagen. It has all the details from where to stay, places to eat, things to do, and everything else that you might need to plan your trip.

Best Time To Visit

While I visited Copenhagen at the start of spring, but I’d strongly recommend visiting Copenhagen during summers. The summers are just beautiful in Europe. The entire city is blooming with flowers, and the weather is really pleasant. It’s sunny for the most part of the days. Spring in Europe is still wintery and sometimes even rainy.

Tip: You can also plan your trip in winters when it’s snowing. Although it doesn’t snow much in Copenhagen so you can club your trip with visiting fjords in Norway or Lapland in Finland to witness northern lights.

How to Reach Copenhagen

Lufthavn, Copenhagen is a really huge and really busy international airport. It has flights in and out from all almost major cities of the world. There’s also a metro station inside the airport with good connectivity to all major stations of Copenhagen.

Alternatively, you can also find cabs right outside the airport.

Getting around in Copenhagen

There are multiple taxi services in Copenhagen. The popular ones are 4X35 and 4X37, these are also available to book through their apps. You can also call them on their helpline 35353535 or 37373737 to book one taxi. Metro and buses are other good and cheaper options to roam around the city. One bus ticket costs around 24 Krones. You can even get a city pass that lets you take the bus and metro at no additional costs and also has access to a few tourist spots.

We mostly walked around the city or cycled to a place. Cycles are very very popular in Copenhagen and most people commute to places from bicycles.

Accommodation in Copenhagen

Accommodation in Copenhagen is no big problem. There are plenty of hostels, hotels, and b&bs to your choosing. Hostels are pretty common and popular in Copenhagen given that most tourists in the city are youngsters.

I stayed in a b&B in Vesterbro during the first 6 days. Vesterbro is one of the posh areas of Copenhagen. There are plenty of shopping outlets and centers, cafes and restaurants at your disposal. Here’s the link to the b&b I stayed in.

For the next 2 days, Anshul and I were guests of the Copenhagen Marriott hotel. Here’s a complete review of our stay in Copenhagen Marriott Hotel.

After our 3-week road trip in France, we flew back to Copenhagen to catch our flight to Austin. We stayed in the Bedwoods Hostel for a night. Another hip hostel in the district of Norrebro, just by Nyhavn.

Where to Eat in Copenhagen

Copenhagen has no shortage of cafes and restaurants when it comes to food. Here are a few of my favorites that I’d definitely recommend everyone.

Mads & Kaffe, Vesterbro

Leo’s Pizza, Vesterbro

Central Hotel and Caffe (this is a cafe in the world’s smallest hotel). It is definitely worth a visit for a coffee and panini.

Things to do in Copenhagen

There is a plethora of things to do in Copenhagen and 4-5 days are enough if you want to explore the city to its core. The city is divided into several districts and I ‘d recommend keeping one day per district. Start with Norrebro, then go to Osterbro, Vesterbro, and then end your trip with by spending a day at Fredericksberg.

Here’s a list of things you should definitely have on your itinerary.

Nyhavn

Spend a few hours on the historical port of Copenhagen today known as Nyhavn. You’ll be amazed by the archaic colorful buildings, which are now preserved as hotels, homes, and restaurants. I will, however, suggest that the restaurants at Nyhavn are notoriously overpriced. You can walk a few steps all the way to Stroget street and find some really amazing cafes and diners. I’d definitely suggest taking a canal tour. There are multiple operators of the canal tours, take your time browsing through them and look out for best rates.

Indre By

Indre By is the old town area of Copenhagen. It is basically right in the middle of the city with a few historical monuments and popular tourist spots around. You can just walk for 10 mins from the Nyhavn post and take a walk into any small alleys. The cobbled roads, live jazz music, and the flowery windows and door will blow you away. You’ll find people sitting right outside cafes, sipping their coffees. A few might even be singing and a few coming back from work. Indre By is the perfect place to get the feeling of European feeling.

Stroget

Stroget street is a shopper’s paradise. It’s only a few minutes walk from Nyhavn, right by the Christianborg Palace. You’ll find all kinds of luxury brands to shop from the Stroget.

Christianborg Palace, Amelienborg Castle, and Rosenborg Castle

I’d highly recommend taking a tour of the castles of Copenhagen. You will not be disappointed with the architecture and rich cultural history.

Rundetaarn

The Round Tower is a gorgeous structure right in the heart of the city. You might have to climb what is equivalent to 500 stairs but the views of the city are a no-miss. The sunsets are a definite must-dos.

Spend a few hours at Tivoli Gardens.

Tivoli Gardens are a perfect spot if you want to spend a few hours in the evening. The entire amusement park is brightly lit up with lights and frivolous music. Make sure you check out if the gardens are open or not because they are usually closed during the rains and winter season.

Explore the streets of Vesterbro

Vesterbro has a completely vibe altogether. The streets are filled with hip cafes and bars and trendy shopper outlets. You might even find a few good murals on the street. You can spend a few hours strolling Vaernedamsvej and Vestre Cemetery and eat at the famous Central Hotel and Caffe. This is the cafe in the world’s smallest hotel, do try the panini.

The Kastellet

Make sure you take out a reasonable amount of time for this piece of gem. Pack a picnic, rent a bike and just wander around the star-shaped park. You’ll come across a beautiful church, a gorgeous windmill and a few lakes. There are fewer people there and most of them are just out for a run. Find a wooden bench by the lake and just enjoy the day with your loved ones.

Explore Christianhavn and the hippie neighborhood of Christiania

A lot of people confuse Christianhavn with Christiania as they sound almost similar. Christiania is a smaller neighborhood in Christianhavn. I’d recommend spending an entire day in Christianhavn as there are plenty of things to do around the neighborhood. Christianhavn is just as similar as Nyhavn with a beautiful canal and colorful buildings on cobbled streets on both sides of the canal. There are a few canal tours operators in Christianhavn as well who offer similar tours with fewer tourists and cheaper prices. Most people go to Christiania and skip Christianhavn altogether. I, however, found it completely fascinating. It’s a lesser touristy version of Nyhavn and really peaceful.

Christiania, on the other hand, is a completely different world altogether. You’ll find this place brimming with tourists, mostly youngsters looking for some marijuana and weed. The wall art and murals are definitely eye-catching and worth the visit.

You can also climb up to Church of our Savior for a great vantage point of the city.

That’s it! This is everything I thought you might need to plan a trip to Copenhagen. If there’s anything you think I missed or should be a part of this itinerary, do let me know in comments below.

 

 

 

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